Thank You

April 14th, 2017 → 4:38 pm @ // No Comments

Thank You

A very heartfelt thank you to all of you who watched the live book launch yesterday from Orlando. The feedback I have been received is most appreciated.

Thank you again


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

The Vault is Open

April 12th, 2017 → 8:45 pm @ // No Comments

The Vault is Open

 

Few topics have been written about as much as SUCCESS. Even among the most seriously discussed subjects like religion and politics, the concept of success plays a critical role. Something just as interesting is that success means different things to each of us. This reflects the individuality that we enjoy. In a commercial context, success is most often measured using the currency of exchange as well as the achievement of goals. Philosophically, success may even be the attainment of a mental state of satisfaction as a result of your actions or thoughts. Whichever way you look at it, success is a topic of interest to everyone.

Over the last 7 months, I have been working on a book with some of the leading professionals from all around the world—including the legendary Brian Tracy!  In the process of writing this book, we all agreed to reveal our top business secrets that consistently allow us to improve our health, wealth and SUCCESS—even in the New Economy.  It was tough to get some to agree, but the only way we were going to do this, was if everyone was held to the same code, share the best secrets you’ve got.

The great news is that we got everyone to agree, and the book that we all wrote together, Cracking the Code to Success is coming out Tomorow!  The Celebrity Experts® in this book allow you see their formulas for success, and through their experiences, offer many valuable lessons (including pitfalls to avoid) that are particularly meaningful. Just as action is an integral part of success, mentoring means a faster rate of achievement. However, despite our changing world, we know that the basic tenets of success remain the same, no matter how fast the pace. The Celebrity Experts® in are willing to mentor you. They have lived what it is all about. . .

 We’ll be launching the book this tomorrow April 13th,  (don’t worry I’ll remind you!), and I’ve put together a huge bonus package for you if you’ll help us launch the book on Thursday!

I appreciate your support and I’ll get back with you to remind you about the launch and to tell you more about the bonuses I’m putting together!

Stay tuned!

Jan


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

The Right Culture: Not About Employee Happiness

April 12th, 2017 → 2:35 pm @ // No Comments

The Right Culture: Not About Employee Happiness

by Jim Harter and Annamarie Mann

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Measuring workers’ contentment doesn’t improve business outcomes
  • Approaching engagement as a business strategy yields better results
  • Highly engaged organizations share common philosophies and practices

Creating a great workplace culture that has star employees who know how to win new customers isn’t about making employees happy or content — and organizations falter when they think it is.

It’s true that enthusiastic and energetic employees feel better about their work and workplace. But engagement is not determined by an abstract feeling. Measuring workers’ contentment or happiness levels, as well as catering to their wants, often fails to achieve the underlying goal of employee engagement: improved business outcomes.

Organizations have more success with engagement and improve business performance when they treat employees as stakeholders of their own future and the company’s future. This means focusing on concrete performance management activities, such as clarifying work expectations, getting people what they need to do their work, providing development and promoting positive coworker relationships.

The majority of the U.S. workforce (51%) is not engaged, according to Gallup’s State of the American Workplace report. These employees are indifferent and neither like nor dislike their job. They represent a risk, and that risk can tilt either way — good or bad.

Many employees who are not engaged want a reason to be inspired. They are the “show me” group that needs an extra push to perform at their best. While positive feelings, such as happiness, are usually byproducts of engagement, they shouldn’t be confused with the primary outcomes. Rather, the primary emphasis should be on elements that engage workers and drive results, such as clarity of expectations, the opportunity to do what they do best, development and opinions counting.

A Business Strategy

Approaching engagement as a business strategy yields clear and better results. Last year, Gallup conducted the ninth version of our meta-analysis (a study of studies) to determine the relationship of engagement — as measured by Gallup’s employee engagement survey — to business-/work-unit profitability, productivity, employee retention and customer perception.

Despite massive changes in the economy and technology, the results of the most recent meta-analysis are consistent with the results of each previous version. Simply put, engaged employees produce better business outcomes than other employees do — across industries, company sizes and nationalities, and in good economic times and bad.

Business or work units that score in the top quartile of their organization in employee engagement have nearly double the odds of success (based on a composite of financial, customer, retention, safety, quality, shrinkage and absenteeism metrics) when compared with those in the bottom quartile. Those at the 99th percentile have four times the success rate of those at the first percentile.

When compared with business units in the bottom quartile of engagement, those in the top quartile realize improvements in the following areas, among others:

Showing up and staying: Engaged employees make it a point to show up to work and do more work — highly engaged business units realize a 41% reduction in absenteeism and a 17% increase in productivity. Engaged workers also are more likely to stay with their employers. In high-turnover organizations, highly engaged business units achieve 24% less turnover. In low-turnover organizations, the gains are even more dramatic: Highly engaged business units achieve 59% less turnover. High-turnover organizations are those with more than 40% annualized turnover, and low-turnover organizations are those with 40% or lower annualized turnover.

Customer outcomes: Employees who are engaged consistently show up to work and have a greater commitment to quality and safety. Understandably, these employees also help their organizations improve customer relationships and obtain impressive organic growth. Highly engaged business units achieve a 10% increase in customer ratings and a 20% increase in sales.

Profit: The previous outcomes collide to bring organizations increased profitability. Engaged employees are more present and productive; they are more attuned to the needs of customers; and they are more observant of processes, standards and systems. When taken together, the behaviors of highly engaged business units result in 21% greater profitability.

Creating the Right Culture Is Possible

Employee engagement has long been a concern in the U.S. workforce, but — perhaps now more than ever — it represents a vital component of employee attraction and retention. For the modern workforce, an engaging work environment is a fundamental expectation, a baseline requirement. Many employees refuse to settle for an organization that does not strategically prioritize engagement. For leaders, this means a culture of engagement is no longer an option — it is an urgent need.

Creating a culture of engagement requires more than completing an annual employee survey and then leaving managers on their own, hoping they will learn something from the survey results that will change the way they manage. It requires an organization to take a close look at how critical engagement elements align with their performance development and human capital strategies.

Engaging employees takes work and commitment, but it is not impossible. One-third of the overall U.S. workforce is engaged. And many organizations come to Gallup with even lower percentages of engaged employees — the median engagement level among our first-year clients is 30%.

But as they shift their approach, these organizations begin to realize improvements in performance. The engagement level among recent Gallup clients is 44%, and it is even higher among clients with the highest levels of engagement — the winners of the Gallup Great Workplace Award. In these organizations, an average of 70% of employees are engaged, and there are 14 engaged employees for every actively disengaged employee — a ratio that is seven times the national average.

Highly engaged organizations share common philosophies and practices. Among other things:

  • They know creating a culture of engagement starts at the top.
  • Their leaders are aligned in prioritizing engagement as a competitive, strategic point of differentiation.
  • They communicate openly and consistently.
  • They place the utmost importance on using the right metrics and on hiring and developing great managers.

Highly engaged organizations also hold their managers accountable — not just for their team’s measured engagement level, but also for how it relates to their team’s overall performance. They ensure that managers are engaging employees from the first minute of their first day at work.

These organizations have well-defined and comprehensive development programs for leaders and managers, and they focus on the development of individuals and teams. Employee engagement is a fundamental consideration in their people strategy, not an annual “check-the-box” activity.

This article is part of Gallup’s State of the Workplace Initiative.


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Can You Manage Employees You Can’t See?

April 10th, 2017 → 2:08 pm @ // No Comments

Can You Manage Employees You Can’t See?

Story Highlights

  • Growing work-at-home trend poses challenges for managers
  • Managers need to be more deliberate about managing remote workers
  • Creating virtual communities helps in managing remote employees

Up to 43% of U.S. employees spend at least some of their time working outside of the office — and the trend is growing. This poses new and urgent challenges for managers who may not often see some of their best employees in person.

The term “remote workers” captures both employees who are never physically in the office and flexible remote workers who retain a space in the office but work from home a few days a week.

According to Gallup’s State of the American Workplace report, many organizations are realizing that creating flexible work arrangements is attractive to both the employee and the organization. Employees who work remotely some of time show greater levels of engagement, and 35% of employees say they would change jobs to have flexible working locations where they can choose to work off-site full time. Many talented workers — particularly millennials — seek flexible work arrangements.

Remote working does not immediately create higher levels of engagement. In order to ensure that this arrangement is successful, managers have to assume an active role in connecting with the employee.

Tactics the Best Managers Use

After speaking with several managers who supervise remote employees, Gallup has found a few key tactics the best managers employ:

Be intentional. Managers must become more deliberate about when and how they communicate with remote employees. They do not need to have daily 30-minute “check-in” conversations, but should make an effort to connect with them consistently — whether through phone calls, email, instant or text messaging, or videoconferencing. Ongoing, meaningful communication can help establish an environment of trust and accountability, while still giving remote employees a sense of independence.

Know the needs of your followers. By establishing frequent and meaningful conversations, managers can begin to evoke trust and accountability in their remote employees. Gallup’s research into the needs of followers insists that trust, compassion, hope and stability are all key factors in building a followership. This also applies to the relationships between managers and remote workers.

Successful managers from large, well-known companies all stressed the importance of getting to know your employees as people and caring for them as individuals. They also send clear, concise and uniform messages to all remote employees and conduct frequent, ongoing discussions about career progression. This individualization and attention to detail help build the foundation their followers need to feel safe.

Create a virtual community. It’s hard for remote employees to feel connected to their teams and the organization if they rarely or never meet in person. Successful managers of remote workers cultivate a social environment through effective use of technology.

One manager, knowing how important it was for the team to experience rituals and events as if they were in an office, held a virtual baby shower for an employee. This manager made sure to deliver the gifts and cake in a timely fashion to the expectant mother and gathered the entire team through videoconference to virtually celebrate and play games.

Not all managers will want to go to this length, but managers should be careful to effectively re-create the office culture through technology, thus giving remote employees the feeling of being part of a larger team.

Meet in person. While technology can help re-create the office culture and connect remote workers to their coworkers, successful managers of remote workers note the immense power of face-to-face team meetings. There is an understated power in sharing a meal, exchanging jokes and stories, and connecting in the same physical space.

The method and frequency of these meetings can vary from person to person. But if the budget and schedules allow, many successful remote teams meet at least once a year in person. After these in-person meetings, managers often say there is renewed enthusiasm and a sense of pride and mission.

Motivating and managing the performance of the employees whom managers rarely see is a unique challenge. However, the good news is that compared with many employees, 100% stay-at-home workers have a greater understanding of their role and feel a more profound sense of ownership for their performance. They know what to do and believe their performance is measured in ways that are fair and motivational.

This article is part of Gallup’s State of the Workplace Initiative.


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

You are invited to attend my book launch live on April 13th Here is the Registration address. http://ambitious.com/crackingcode-signup

April 1st, 2017 → 5:44 pm @ // No Comments

You are invited to attend my book launch live on April 13th Here is the Registration address. http://ambitious.com/crackingcode-signup

Social Media - Ambitious LIVE Course - Jan Makela.png


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Headed to the big easy

March 24th, 2017 → 8:58 pm @ // No Comments

Headed to the big easy

Looking forward to the 87 people who I will have the opportunity to meet and work with.


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement