Why employee engagement falls short

November 14th, 2017 → 3:04 pm @ // No Comments

Why employee engagement falls short

Two reasons employee engagement falls short from the article recently reported by Gallup.

Why have some companies massively boosted their number of engaged employees, while others have not? It comes down to two reasons.

  1. An employee engagement program needs to be a manager education and development initiative, not a measurement initiative — but many are really just the latter. An annual survey by itself does not help anyone. The survey should be just an audit of whether things are getting better. But the program should be all about providing managers with learning and tools to increase engagement within their teams, week in and week out — through ongoing conversations between managers and their employees.

    Many companies simply conduct an annual survey and more or less tell managers to “get better,” but they don’t sufficiently follow up. This has never worked and will never work. It’s not what our most successful clients do.

    Any company with an “engagement program” should step back and look at what that program actually entails. If the program is all about arming managers with learning and tools to better engage their people every day, then it’s on the right track. If it is merely an annual survey and reporting exercise, the organization should close it down, regroup and start over.

  2. Companies are not nearly selective enough about whom they name as their managers, at every level. Most people become managers either because they were top individual performers or because they’ve been around the company a long time. Neither of those two things has ever shown a strong relationship to being a good manager. In fact, Gallup research has found that only 10% of human beings are naturally wired to be great managers — and some others, while not naturally gifted, are teachable. But companies choose candidates with the right talent for the job only 18% of the time.

While great manager education and development can help almost anyone be a better manager, it works a lot better if you invest heavily in people who are already wired to be great in the role. There are scientific ways to accomplish this: psychological assessments, better interviewing questions by hiring managers, etc. Companies need to use this science.


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

The article I wrote for Promotional Products Business was published

November 8th, 2017 → 11:03 pm @ // No Comments

The article I wrote for Promotional Products Business was published

Promotional Products Business: Five Smarter Ways To Manage Others – October 23, 2017


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Employee Engagement

Featured in Forbes Magazine.com

November 5th, 2017 → 3:51 pm @ // No Comments

Featured in Forbes Magazine.com

https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2017/11/02/15-methods-of-every-effective-public-speaker/#635fef603047


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Employee Engagement

Thank you to all of you in South and North Carolina

November 4th, 2017 → 2:42 pm @ // No Comments

Thank you to all of you in South and North Carolina

Thank you to all of you in South and North Carolina for the wonderful reception and participation in the seminars this week. You rocked it. I appreciate the warm comments and again thank you


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Employee Engagement

Five Pillars to Success as a Manager from my article published in Lab Manager

October 29th, 2017 → 8:11 am @ // No Comments

Five Pillars to Success as a Manager from my article published in Lab Manager

Lab Manager » Management Tips » Five Pillars to Success as a Manager
Five Pillars to Success as a Manager
There are five defined pillars of success that managers can rely on to help them succeed in their aim to boost employee retention

By Jan Makela | October 18, 2017
Five Pillars of Management

Why does your organization exist, and why should anyone care? Organizations exist to perform—period. Be for-profit or non-profit, they all exist to do something, make a product, or supply a service.

Today, many employers say they’re having trouble retaining their younger employees—specifically millennials. At 82 million strong, millennials are the workforce of the future. Studies have shown they want to work where they can make a difference and contribute to something bigger than themselves.

It’s imperative to realize that the people in your organization—especially young people—are the fuel to your long-term success, and the one person who affects that outcome more than any other is the frontline manager. Fortunately, there are five defined pillars of success that managers can rely on to help them succeed in their aim to boost employee retention.

Engage employees with a compelling vision of what is expected, and provide the mission to achieve that vision. Why? What’s in it for the employee to want to achieve for you? People respond when they are doing or contributing to something bigger than themselves. When national crises such as earthquakes or hurricanes occur, people are driven to volunteer not because they have to, but because they want to. Your vision and the culture you create are the reasons you exist.
Tell your people that without them doing what they do you wouldn’t achieve the results that you desire. The way employees view a job and its role in their life is evolving. Employees don’t just come to work for a paycheck. They seek a purpose, the opportunity to do what they do best every day, and to lead a life they desire for their families and themselves.

Make decisions based on productivity. By keeping your eye on the goal and having your people similarly focused, everyone will understand why certain decisions are made and can buy in. If disagreements occur in discussions they are welcomed because they are focused on achieving a better outcome toward the end objective. When disagreements occur, be sure to ask what the ultimate goal is.
Motivate every team member to take action. People are more likely to take action if they know what is expected of them. When expectations are clearly defined, employees are less likely to disappoint their manager or their peers. Employees will work together without your direction or approval when they all know what is expected and have bought into achieving the desired results. Most people are going to live up or down to their perception of the expectations of them. If your people don’t know what is expected, don’t be surprised by what you get.
Have the assertiveness to drive outcomes. Are you more concerned with the process or the outcome? Managers are in place to strive for positive outcomes. Employees may find ways to produce an outcome that the manager never thought of. Provide employees the freedom to experiment and try new ways of doing things. Keep progress results in front of the employees. If they do not see the progress they are making as a team, they will lose interest over time and productivity will wane.
When your staff see that their work is making a difference they will continue to contribute. If you avoid providing appropriate feedback on your employees’ progress, you’ll immediate notice a decline in the contributions of team members. Remember, feedback is the breakfast of champions—be generous with your thoughts and expectations.

Create a culture that you want. Culture impacts every aspect of how you get things done, from hiring and developing the talents of the employees to customer service. Define your desired culture and then take it from words to actions. If you don’t like the culture you currently have or the results that you are currently obtaining, you are the only person who can change it. Your actions have to mirror what you desire. Do you allow negative behavior to go unchallenged? Realize negative behavior brings down all your good employees. Your employees are watching and if they see you doing nothing, your lack of action has sent a powerful message. You don’t care!
Employees are not going to care if the manager doesn’t care. When employees know that the manager truly cares about them as a people, they will walk through fire for the manager. When people believe the manager doesn’t care, the employees will let the manager walk off a cliff. This caring gets to the heart of employee engagement.

By creating a workplace where people want to come to work instead of because they have to come to work, managers will see positive changes. Most people don’t wake up in the morning and say, “I think I will do a bad job today.” Help them achieve the results necessary for the organization but in a way that each and every employee’s contribution is recognized and appreciated.

About the Author

Jan Makela is an executive coach, highly-sought after speaker, and best-selling author of Cracking the Code to Success and Be the Manager People Won’t Leave. Jan has a long and successful history of working with companies to ensure quality hiring and training practices. His specialty revolves around strength-based leadership development, with a particular focus on working with senior and mid-level executives, business owners, and professionals. For more information on Jan Makela, please visit www.StrengthBasedLeadership.net.

Categories: Management Tips
Tags: employee retention, motivation, Millennials, leadership


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Employee Engagement

Five Pillars to Success as a Manager was recently published by Article Weekly

October 27th, 2017 → 8:04 pm @ // No Comments

Five Pillars to Success as a Manager was recently published by Article Weekly

By Jan Makela

Why does your organization exist, and why should anyone care? Organizations exist to perform—period. Be for-profit or non-profit, they all exist to do something, make a product, or supply a service.

Today, many employers say they’re having trouble retaining their younger employees—specifically Millennials. At 82 million strong, Millennials are the workforce of the future. Studies have shown they want to work where they can make a difference and contribute to something bigger than themselves.

It’s imperative to realize that the people in your organization—especially young people—are the fuel to your long-term success, and the one person who affects that outcome more than any other is the frontline manager. Fortunately, there are five defined pillars of success that managers can rely on to help them succeed in their aim to boost employee retention.

1. Engage employees with a compelling vision of what is expected, and provide the mission to achieve that vision. Why? What’s in it for the employee to want to achieve for you? People respond when they are doing or contributing to something bigger than themselves. When national crises such as earthquakes or hurricanes occur, people are driven to volunteer not because they have to, but because they want to. Your vision and the culture you create are the reasons you exist.

Tell your people that without them doing what they do you wouldn’t achieve the results that you desire. The way employees view a job and its role in their life is evolving. Employees don’t just come to work for a paycheck. They seek a purpose, the opportunity to do what they do best every day, and to lead a life they desire for their families and themselves.

2. Make decisions based on productivity. By keeping your eye on the goal and having your people similarly focused, everyone will understand why certain decisions are made and can buy in. If disagreements occur in discussions they are welcomed because they are focused on achieving a better outcome toward the end objective. When disagreements occur, be sure to ask what the ultimate goal is.

3. Motivate every team member to take action. People are more likely to take action if they know what is expected of them. When expectations are clearly defined, employees are less likely to disappoint their manager or their peers. Employees will work together without your direction or approval when they all know what is expected and have bought into achieving the desired results. Most people are going to live up or down to their perception of the expectations of them. If your people don’t know what is expected, don’t be surprised by what you get.
Employees are not going to care if the manager doesn’t care. CLICK TO TWEET

4. Have the assertiveness to drive outcomes. Are you more concerned with the process or the outcome? Managers are in place to strive for positive outcomes. Employees may find ways to produce an outcome that the manager never thought of. Provide employees the freedom to experiment and try new ways of doing things. Keep progress results in front of the employees. If they do not see the progress they are making as a team, they will lose interest over time and productivity will wain.

When your staff see that their work is making a difference they will continue to contribute. If you avoid providing appropriate feedback on your employees’ progress, you’ll immediate notice a decline in the contributions of team members. Remember, feedback is the breakfast of champions—be generous with your thoughts and expectations.

5. Create a culture that you want. Culture impacts every aspect of how you get things done, from hiring and developing the talents of the employees to customer service. Define your desired culture and then take it from words to actions. If you don’t like the culture you currently have or the results that you are currently obtaining, you are the only person who can change it. Your actions have to mirror what you desire. Do you allow the negative behavior to go unchallenged? Realize negative behavior brings down all your good employees. Your employees are watching and if they see you doing nothing, your lack of action has sent a powerful message. You don’t care!

Employees are not going to care if the manager doesn’t care. When employees know that the manager truly cares about them as a people, they will walk through fire for the manager. When people believe the manager doesn’t care the employees will let the manager walk off a cliff. This caring gets to the heart of employee engagement.

By creating a workplace where people want to come to work instead because they have to come to work managers will see positive changes. Most people don’t wake up in the morning and say, “I think I will do a bad job today.” Help them achieve the results necessary for the organization, but in a way that each and every employee’s contribution is recognized and appreciated.

Jan Makela is an executive coach, highly-sought after speaker, and best-selling author of Cracking the Code to Success and Be the Manager People Won’t Leave. Jan has a long and successful history of working with companies to ensure quality hiring and training practices. His specialty revolves around strength-based leadership development, with a particular focus on working with senior and mid-level executives, business owners, and professionals. For more information on Jan Makela, please visit https://strengthbasedleadership.net/


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Recently featured in Forbes Magazine

October 22nd, 2017 → 2:59 pm @ // No Comments

Recently featured in Forbes Magazine


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Ideas from the Quill Awards

October 13th, 2017 → 3:01 pm @ // No Comments

Ideas from the Quill Awards

Jack Canfield says keep going until someone gets goosebumps- Advice on looking for a publisher

Who you spend time with is who you become

If you stop being curious you are dead – Mark Cuban

Your future is 100% yours value the people you work with


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Lessons from the Quill Awards

October 12th, 2017 → 2:58 pm @ // No Comments

Lessons from the Quill Awards

Nothing magical will ever happen outside until you change inside

It going to take courage and if you are afraid you will never try to succeed

CEO’s don’t use this “Failure is a learning experience. Take failure out of your vocabulary

You only have to take the next step

Everyone is strapped for cash – Branson Virgin Atlantic – There is always away


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Employee Engagement

Want to change your world? Words to live by and help you get what you deserve

October 10th, 2017 → 2:49 pm @ // No Comments

Want to change your world? Words to live by and help you get what you deserve

I recently had the opportunity at the National Association of Experts, Writers & Speakers to receive the Quill Award for Best Selling Author. More importantly, I spent the time to learn from people who have inspired the world, like Jack Canfield, Brian Tracy, Kenny Thomas (Blackhawk Down) and many others.

I will be sharing over the next several days some of the takeaways from these life-changing people.

Kenny Thomas – The example you set for the people you serve is not based on rank or position – You are as good as your weakest link

The mission is on the wall -On time on target plus or minus 30 seconds.

When you are doing it for others you won’t quit. When you are doing it for your self you can quit

 


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Employee Engagement