Why Your School District is Loosing The Best Teachers – Part two of the series

April 21st, 2018 → 1:10 am @ // No Comments

Why Your School District is Loosing The Best Teachers – Part two of the series

How to Keep Your Best Teachers

Considering the costs of replacing teachers, and with fewer teachers in the available candidate pool and more open teaching positions, districts must work to differentiate their employee value proposition to attract, recruit, develop and retain talented teachers.

District leaders can start by focusing on four approaches to attract and retain top teacher talent in the face of a seemingly systemic teacher shortage.

1. Know who is in your candidate pool.

Labor market data would contend that there will continue to be fewer qualified teaching candidates available in the pool in the years to come. Thus, to win qualified candidates, district leaders need to better understand the type of talent they are competing for. The vast majority of new teachers entering the profession are millennials.

According to Gallup’s How Millennials Want to Work and Live report, millennial job seekers are most attracted to workplaces that provide opportunities to learn and grow. Still, 48% of millennials say that overall compensation is extremely important to them when seeking new job opportunities. Millennial teachers want both a paycheck and a purpose-driven career. District leaders should ensure their employee proposition to millennials seeking teaching positions reflects this generation’s needs of individualized growth and development.

2. Engineer an exit survey program to better understand your district’s challenges.

Just as critical as understanding who is coming into the district is understanding who is leaving the district and why.

Teachers leaving a district is nothing new. However, given the high stakes of the teacher shortage, smart district leaders are looking for more insights into why their teachers are resigning. They want to understand the reasons for the departure and gain in-depth insights into how to retain their best. As a response, many school districts are focusing more on exit survey programs.

An effective exit process enables a district to not only reduce turnover, but also improve incumbent teacher engagement. For example, discovering that teachers who are leaving feel unappreciated provides an opportunity to emphasize workplace recognition and, in turn, increase teacher engagement.

3. Maximize your data through predictive turnover analytics.

Exit data are valuable, but forward-thinking leaders don’t stop there — they get ahead of turnover by predicting it before it happens. Predictive turnover analytics could help uncover risk factors for turnover, which would allow leaders to anticipate and mitigate problems before teachers leave.

District personnel should conduct predictive turnover analyses using employee engagement data, performance data, demographics, principal/parent metrics and information about school- and team-level environments. Additionally, pairing teacher survey, performance and employment data with information about intention to stay or leave the district can be a powerful, data-driven exercise that alleviates teacher departures.

4. Engage your top talent to stop them from leaving your district.

Of the four approaches, district leaders likely have the most control over this one.

Teaching is a challenging but rewarding career. According to recent Gallup data, only 34% of teachers are engaged in their job. Further, Gallup analytics show that 46% of K-12 teachers report high daily stress during the school year.

However, Gallup also finds that when talented, high-performing employees are not engaged in their job, they are just as likely as disengaged, low performers to quit their job. To engage teachers, leaders must provide a path for them to follow to boost their development, have creativity and autonomy in the classroom, and create a thriving learning environment for students. District leaders should measure teacher engagement in their district and encourage school-level conversations and action planning to improve engagement and teacher retention.

In the war for highly talented teachers, retention is the best defensive strategy a district can use. If you are not engaging and developing your teachers, they will find another district or profession that will.


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Your School District is Loosing The Best Teachers and here is why. Two part series

April 20th, 2018 → 1:09 am @ // No Comments

Your School District is Loosing The Best Teachers and here is why. Two part series

Will the talented teachers in your district extend their contracts for another year?

The chances are good that your high-talent teachers are on the lookout for other job opportunities. Gallup’s research shows that almost half of teachers (48%) in the U.S. say they are actively looking for a different job now or watching for opportunities. At the beginning of the 2017-18 school year, almost every U.S. state had shortages of teachers in major subject areas.

According to the Learning Policy Institute, the economics of the teacher shortage are somewhat clear. The demand for teachers is growing because of stricter requirements on teacher-to-student ratios and increasing student enrollment in public schools. Meanwhile, teacher supply is diminishing because fewer people are enrolling in teacher preparation programs in college and current teachers are leaving the profession.

These market forces and the growing national teacher shortages are challenging district leaders to rethink and focus on their human capital strategies. Some states have turned to drastic measures to fill these educator roles by hiring college graduates without a teacher certification or formal teaching experience.

However, within these dramatic headlines and statistics, variability exists, and some districts are thriving despite these macroeconomic forces. Some districts have candidate-to-hire ratios at 20:1, while others are 2:1 — a coin flip to see which candidate a district will place in the classroom.

Why Teachers Leave

Gallup recently asked teachers to recall the primary reason they left their last job and categorized their responses. We found that 29% of teachers left for personal reasons such as relocation or health reasons.

Of the remaining teachers who left for job-related reasons, 16% were terminated involuntarily and 84% left voluntarily. The reasons employees cited for leaving voluntarily are particularly insightful, as they might reflect more actionable school-level factors.

By a large margin, the primary reason teachers gave for leaving their last job was career advancement or development, with 60% of teachers who left voluntarily citing reasons related to this category.

This percentage shows that many teachers might not have felt challenged in their work or received individualized opportunities to grow and advance, so they left their job. Even though many districts invest heavily in professional development programs, these opportunities might not be individualized to teachers’ specific growth and development needs.

Pay or benefits was the next most cited reason for leaving, with 13% of teachers who left voluntarily mentioning this reason. Low pay, especially early in an educator’s career, could stifle the attractiveness of the profession, especially for individuals carrying large student debt burdens.

Despite a prevailing focus on low teacher pay, teachers actually mentioned their pay as the reason they left their last job at a lower rate compared with other workers. One in four (24%) non-teachers voluntarily left their last job because of pay.

Turnover can cost an organization anywhere from one-half to five times the employee’s salary. The variability in this number is the result of the difficulty in measuring both hard costs, such as advertising and training, as well as some of the unseen costs, such as the impact on team morale and student relationships.


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Now Recertified by Gallup in Strength Based Leadership

April 19th, 2018 → 1:01 am @ // No Comments

Now Recertified by Gallup in Strength Based Leadership

Image
Gallup strengths Coach


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Part two of the series – Are you sure you have a great work-place culture

April 5th, 2018 → 1:51 pm @ // No Comments

Part two of the series – Are you sure you have a great work-place culture

Truly great cultures are different because they are loaded with star team leaders. You might ask, “Gallup, over your 40 years of studying lousy-to-great cultures, have you found a silver bullet?” Our Chief Workplace Scientist Jim Harter would answer, “Yes, the silver bullet is your managers (team leaders).” They, by themselves, determine if you have a lousy, good or great culture. They are the silver bullet.

Remarkably, 70% of the variance between lousy, good and great cultures can be found in the knowledge, skills and talent of the team leader. Not the players, but the team leader. This is one of Gallup’s most profound workplace breakthroughs.

So you say, “What exactly do you recommend?” Our answer is, it depends on where your culture is today. If it’s lousy, you should start over. Get out a clean canvas and announce you are reorganizing the whole company.

If you have a solid, “good” culture, you should significantly re-engineer it with all the best breakthroughs, tools and learnings.

If you actually have a great culture now, you can — believe it or not — boom it even higher above the lousy-to-good workplaces. For whatever reason, the great cultures seem to benefit more from new dynamic processes. For instance, great companies got more benefits, more quickly from Six Sigma and lean management than lousy cultures, where these methods basically didn’t work.

Gallup recommends, first, change your team’s leadership philosophy from the current command-and-control to one of high development, high purpose and strengths-based coaching. If you do these three things well, you will immediately experience more innovation and entrepreneurism, and secure your future.

Second, Gallup recommends making a structural change to what you require in a team leader (manager). Require them to actually coach their team members every week and touch base with them regularly. All the articles about the failure of annual reviews and the need for ongoing conversations are right and a good start — very hard to do well — but definitely right. Great team leaders love using the right tools and learning the new practice of management. They will learn things like high development beats high satisfaction. And high purpose beats workplace benefits.

Our third recommendation: Tell your executive committee and board you are transforming your culture from one of command-and-control to one of high development. When board members ask, “Why?” tell them exactly this: “The practice of management has changed. We are moving to a culture that attracts and holds stars. A culture that creates sudden massive innovation and entrepreneurship — so we can win more customers.”


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Two Part Series – Are You Sure You Have a Great Workplace Culture?

April 4th, 2018 → 1:49 pm @ // No Comments

Two Part Series – Are You Sure You Have a Great Workplace Culture?

“Good” workplace cultures have good people but no stars.

Unlike great cultures, good ones can’t keep game-changing team leaders (managers).

Lousy cultures have miserable managers everywhere — even on the executive committee.

While “satisfied” employees can be found in both lousy and good cultures, satisfied employees don’t provide innovation or entrepreneurism.

Most lousy-to-good cultures are well-meaning. God bless them for that. They just don’t know what to do. So they do what is easy — they deliver “satisfaction” to the troops. Latte machines and volleyball and flex hours and so forth. These are fine — but they have no statistical relationship to creating new customers. You have to believe any star team leader, on any given day, can create new customers and save the company with an idea or breakthrough.

Truly great cultures are different because they are loaded with star team leaders. You might ask, “Gallup, over your 40 years of studying lousy-to-great cultures, have you found a silver bullet?” Our Chief Workplace Scientist Jim Harter would answer, “Yes, the silver bullet is your managers (team leaders).” They, by themselves, determine if you have a lousy, good or great culture. They are the silver bullet.

Remarkably, 70% of the variance between lousy, good and great cultures can be found in the knowledge, skills and talent of the team leader. Not the players, but the team leader. This is one of Gallup’s most profound workplace breakthroughs.

Continued


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Part two of the series- How Managers Excel by Really Coaching Employees

April 3rd, 2018 → 1:52 pm @ // No Comments

Part two of the series- How Managers Excel by Really Coaching Employees

Help Managers Shift to a Performance Development Approach

Gallup’s recent report on re-engineering performance management notes that companies are shifting from traditional performance management practices to a new approach that focuses on performance development. Essentially, this shift requires managers to create an ongoing dialogue about performance that is individualized to the needs and unique talents of each employee.

To master this new approach, managers must take ownership of their employees’ development and think of themselves in a new way: as a coach, not a boss. This approach also requires that leaders take ownership of manager development to teach them how to be effective coaches.

Great coaches aren’t hard to spot. They tend to be managers who take the time to connect with each team member authentically and individually. They value how their employees naturally think and behave and use that information to match employees with assignments and projects that energize them.

These coaches also know that their team members need to be engaged, which is not just about making employees happy. It’s about ensuring that employees have what they need to be successful in their roles and that they have the partnerships, opportunities, support and materials to get there. To this end, managers who excel at coaching have learned how to lead strengths-based and engagement-focused conversations.

The best coaches also know how to make the most out of their interactions. From an employee’s first day on the job to quick check-ins to formal progress discussions, managers who have effective performance conversations aren’t waiting for an annual review to discuss employee needs, successes or opportunities. They are actively involved in the process, day in and day out.

Here’s what the best coaches do in those conversations:

  1. Establish expectations that are clear, collaborative and aligned with the organization’s goals. As quickly as the workplace moves today, employees can become confused when there are conflicting priorities and shifting goals. The best coaches have collaborative dialogues with employees to clarify performance needs and define a path forward together. Working with employees to set clear objectives helps the manager and employee stay aligned with each other, with the team and with the organization.
  2. Have frequent, focused and future-oriented coaching conversations. To some employees, “We’re going to have frequent coaching conversations” can feel an awful lot like “I’m going to be micromanaged.” But there’s a fine line between frequent contact and micromanagement — and managers need to learn how to walk this line. Conversations have to be frequent, focused and future-oriented, even if they include tough feedback on current projects. Ongoing conversations are ultimately about inspiring and energizing employees for the future — not breathing down their necks and constantly checking on their work.
  3. Create accountability that is fair and accurate, as well as developmental and achievement-oriented. Holding employees accountable for their work, their team contributions and their value to clients is still essential. How to hold them accountable is what needs to change. Effective progress reviews don’t just focus on ratings, pay and promotions. They use metrics and evaluation practices that accurately reflect employees’ work and recognize their achievements. Effective reviews also incorporate development goals.

When managers learn how to have strengths-based and engagement-focused conversations aimed at achieving the core principles of performance development, manager-employee interactions feel more encouraging, purposeful and rewarding than the typical annual review. For some managers, this comes naturally. Others may require more help.

by Ben Wigert and Annamarie Mann


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

How Managers Can Excel by Really Coaching Their Employees Two part series

April 2nd, 2018 → 1:50 pm @ // No Comments

How Managers Can Excel by Really Coaching Their Employees Two part series

Reprinted from Gallup.com

by Annamarie Mann and Ben Wigert

Can we talk?

The answer to that simple question may have a profound impact on how employees are managed, now and into the foreseeable future.

It’s certainly a question that front-line managers will have to answer if they want to get the most out of today’s workforce.

The problem is, recent Gallup research finds that only about one in four employees “strongly agree” that their manager provides meaningful feedback to them — or that the feedback they receive helps them do better work. Even more alarming is that a mere 21% of employees strongly agree that their performance is managed in a way that motivates them to do outstanding work.

Many organizations know they have a serious problem with performance management — and they have already started to re-engineer their approaches. One big step that companies are taking is to place far greater importance on more frequent, ongoing performance conversations between the manager and the employee.

Those organizations know that managers and employees need to talk to each other more — a lot more — and much more frequently than during annual or even semiannual reviews.

Many Managers Struggle With Frequent Conversations

While we know that stepping up the frequency of these conversations is crucial, there is a huge caveat: Gallup’s research and experience with clients suggest many managers actually struggle in this area.

In talking with leaders who are beginning to make this shift, we find overwhelming agreement that more frequent conversations between the manager and employee are important. But in our work and discussions with managers, we’ve seen that many don’t feel comfortable assuming these new expectations or that they haven’t received additional support or guidance about how to have these conversations effectively. Some managers don’t even consider it part of their job, which begs the question: Are companies setting managers up to fail by asking them to do something they either don’t know how to do or believe they shouldn’t be doing at all?

The answer has serious implications for companies, as managers have the greatest impact on driving performance and engagement within their teams. Managers need to be at the heart of changing traditional performance management approaches.

Help Managers Shift to a Performance Development Approach

Gallup’s recent report on re-engineering performance management notes that companies are shifting from traditional performance management practices to a new approach that focuses on performance development. Essentially, this shift requires managers to create an ongoing dialogue about performance that is individualized to the needs and unique talents of each employee.

To master this new approach, managers must take ownership of their employees’ development and think of themselves in a new way: as a coach, not a boss. This approach also requires that leaders take ownership of manager development to teach them how to be effective coaches.

Equip your managers to lead effective performance conversations.
Use Gallup’s easy-to-use framework for delivering frequent feedback.

Great coaches aren’t hard to spot. They tend to be managers who take the time to connect with each team member authentically and individually. They value how their employees naturally think and behave and use that information to match employees with assignments and projects that energize them.

These coaches also know that their team members need to be engaged, which is not just about making employees happy. It’s about ensuring that employees have what they need to be successful in their roles and that they have the partnerships, opportunities, support and materials to get there. To this end, managers who excel at coaching have learned how to lead strengths-based and engagement-focused conversations.

The best coaches also know how to make the most out of their interactions. From an employee’s first day on the job to quick check-ins to formal progress discussions, managers who have effective performance conversations aren’t waiting for an annual review to discuss employee needs, successes or opportunities. They are actively involved in the process, day in and day out.

Part two tomorrow


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

How HR Leaders Can Win a Seat at the Table

March 30th, 2018 → 1:47 pm @ // No Comments

How HR Leaders Can Win a Seat at the Table

“Our people are our greatest asset.”

These feel-good words have decorated countless company walls, websites and mission statements.

But let’s be real. Most organizations don’t treat their employees like assets.

Think of it this way: An organization that owns land and buildings ensures those assets are well-maintained — it protects its investments. So, if employees are assets, why are less than one-third of U.S. workers functioning at peak performance efficiency?

Gallup analytics reveal that just 33% of U.S. workers (and 15% of global employees) are engaged at work — meaning they are involved in, enthusiastic about and committed to their job and workplace. When employees are not engaged, performance suffers, and most human resources leaders are not doing what it takes to help their employees reach their fullest performance potential.

HR leaders — especially those who want to assume more participatory roles as strategic business partners and key decision makers — should proactively address this problem like they would any other low-efficiency asset. With the right human capital approach, HR leaders can produce performance results that bolster their credibility and earn them a seat at the table.

Here are four strategies that can help HR leaders maximize their human capital potential and position themselves as prominent organizational leaders.

Analyze What Matters

In a data-driven world, it’s easy to get data-greedy — on a never-ending quest for more or different employee data. The truth is that many companies have all the data they need; what they’re missing is the right analyses. To generate meaningful insights that drive performance, HR leaders need analytics that generate discoveries, not bigger data. They need to properly mine and process the human capital data they have.

For example, analyses regarding basic outcomes (such as employee retention) reveal only limited insights (such as factors that help retain employees). But HR leaders who go a step further in their analyses can determine what high performers do differently, where their best employees come from and how to drive exceptional employee behaviors. Powerful discoveries such as these make all the difference because they reveal outcome-driving actions; they help leaders translate raw data into improved operational effectiveness.

Stop Viewing Employee Engagement as the Goal

Employee engagement is not the final product; it’s the necessary foundation for building a work environment that includes high productivity and performance. HR leaders should view employee engagement as one component of a holistic strategy for building exceptional workplaces.

This is especially true in today’s fast-paced, tech-driven world with shifting workforce demands. HR leaders need to invest in their people in multiple ways, from prioritizing employee well-being to positioning employees based on their innate strengths to adopting leading-edge performance development practices. Leaders who implement a comprehensive,data-driven approach for optimizing human capital can attract, engage, develop and manage unstoppable workforces.

Own Your Role in Realizing a Culture of Engagement

Gallup has been studying organizational culture for decades. We’ve learned that in the world’s highest-performing organizations, HR leaders are the stewards and keepers of the work culture, while executive leaders are the architects who cast the vision for an ideal culture.

It’s on HR leaders’ shoulders to identify which factors foster the desired culture, which successes come from that culture, and how that culture enables organizational objectives and outcomes. Put another way, HR leaders are responsible for transforming words into actions — for inspiring the desired employee behaviors and beliefs. By understanding and owning their pivotal role in creating and sustaining an aspirational culture, HR leaders can promote cultural transformation and stand out in executive leaders’ eyes.

Connect HR Initiatives to Customer Initiatives

Optimizing employee productivity is only part of the equation for organizational success. HR leaders need to think big-picture, discovering which employee strategies most effectively drive organic growth and prioritizing their efforts accordingly. It’s all about aligning employee goals and customer goals, as these critical outcomes predict one another.

For example, celebrating employee successes with frequent recognition can dramatically grow employee engagement. But, when HR leaders take it a step further and celebrate employees who deliver excellence to customers, they encourage customer centricity and demonstrate to senior leaders that they are focused on growing customer outcomes.

HR leaders who aren’t doing something about organizational performance will inevitably stay in supporting roles. But those who look beyond conventional HR agendas and connect employee engagement to customer goals can help leaders tackle burning business problems and emerge as influential strategic advisers.

written by Ed O’Boyal


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Part Three of The Series The Most Expensive Mistake Leaders Can Make

March 28th, 2018 → 10:13 pm @ // No Comments

Part Three of The Series The Most Expensive Mistake Leaders Can Make

 Create accountability: Given that traditional management has been perceived as more “boss” than “coach,” you might assume managers have been effective in delegating and holding employees accountable. But less than half of employees (40%) strongly agree that their boss holds them accountable for their performance goals.

To be meaningful, accountability needs to be achievement-oriented, fair and accurate, and developmental.

When people think of accountability, it is nearly always in the negative sense. Performance evaluations typically have the aura of judgment with a particular focus on fixing problems.

An achievement-oriented review reframes the conversation around future performance, continuous improvement and recognition of excellent work.

Similarly, developmental conversations focus on identifying natural talents and growing them into strengths.

One additional benefit of a coaching mindset is that it reminds you that you are preparing your people for something else.

You have people under your charge, to develop and grow, and someday you will hand them off to others.

Mentoring others to become the best version of themselves gives work meaning that ultimately translates into higher performance and successful future leadership.

From Satisfaction to Ownership

The ultimate goal of re-engineering performance management for your managers is to drive employee performance to increasingly higher levels of excellence — so that they can lead your organization for decades to come.

In practice, this is the difference between “satisfying” employees and building a culture of “ownership.” When managers are invited to take ownership of their own evaluations and goals, and when they feel their boss truly cares about them and their performance, high performance results.

As Charles Schwab famously said, “I have yet to find the man [or woman], however vaulted their station, who does not do better work under the spirit of approval than under the spirit of criticism.”

Meaningful performance development is not only essential for retaining world-class talent, it is also imperative for organizations who are looking to pass on their legacy to the next generation.


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement

Part two of the series The Most Expensive Mistake Leaders Can Make

March 27th, 2018 → 10:11 pm @ // No Comments

Part two of the series The Most Expensive Mistake Leaders Can Make

Continually coach: The typical employee today receives minimal feedback from their boss.

According to Gallup, 28% of employees say they receive feedback a few times a year, while 19% say they receive feedback once a year or less.

This means that meaningful, ongoing feedback is nonexistent for nearly half of American employees.

The solution is to provide performance conversations that are frequent, focused and future-oriented.

At a minimum, leaders should provide meaningful feedback to their direct reports every week and provide substantial developmental coaching each month. The mutually agreed on goals form the basis for these ongoing coaching conversations.

Ongoing conversations provide an opportunity to adjust goals as business changes, rather than delay adjustments until formal progress reviews, when it is often too late. They also provide an opportunity to build confidence in times of crisis.

In 2009, the hotel industry in North America dropped 25% in revenue, due to perceived corporate excess during the financial crisis.

In situations like that, you must give your people something to keep them working hard — because they will need to work even harder to get you out of the hole.

During regular conversations, negative issues should be addressed and success should be recognized and praised. Not only do frequent honest conversations keep employees and managers accountable — they also improve perceptions of fairness.

If feedback only happens during an annual evaluation, employees and managers have no opportunity to fix mistakes, make things right and learn.

Additionally, when ongoing performance conversations occur, annual reviews hold no surprises.

A coach must understand the strengths and weaknesses of his or her team and position each person so they can each reach their highest potential for the greater good.

Leaders who trust their employees and managers with autonomy create confident leaders who feel empowered to make decisions.


Source: Jan Makela Website Feed

Employee Engagement